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John Taylor
 
July 13, 2018 | John Taylor

Our Summer 2018 Newsletter

Hello friends!

 
Summer has come to Napa Valley. Young clusters are appearing on the vines, which will soon become berry clusters. Over the next few weeks, we'll start to see verasion occur, when the grapes turn from green to purple. During that time, we may do a little additional pruning, "dropping" the outside clusters to let the other clusters grow in flavor and intensity.

With long days and warm nights, Napa becomes the perfect place for a summer vacation for wine lovers and newcomers alike. June is also the start of "Cabernet Season" in Napa, when wineries release the signature wines that have made this valley such a magical place. To give people a greater opportunity to maximize their summer vacations, we have changed our hours to stay open later. We have also created a White Wine Tasting that pairs perfectly with the warm weather. We hope you'll make Yao Family Wines a part of your summer vacation plans!

~Tom Hinde, President & Winemaker

Yao Family Wines is proud to release our flagship Cabernet, the 2015 YAO MING Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. Awarded 93 points by Robert Parker, The 2015 has all the balanced power and finese that are the trademarks of our Cabernet, but with an intense purity that is a distinct hallmark of the vintage. 91% Cabernet Sauvignon, 5% Merlot, 2% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot, aged in 100% French oak (65% new) for 18 months. Click Here to add this delicious wine to your cellar.

 

Our Saint Helena tasting room is open later throughout the summer! Come visit us during our new hours:


Monday: 11:00am to 6:00pm
Tuesday: CLOSED
Wednesday: 11:00am to 6:00pm
Thursday: 11:00am to 6:00pm
Friday, Saturday and Sunday: 11:00am to 8:00pm

For more information or to book a reservation, Click Here.

 

Earlier this month, our founder and proprietor, Yao Ming, received his Bachelor's Degree in Economics and Management from Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Fulfilling a promise he made to his mother years ago, Yao enrolled in 2011 and attended classes over the next seven years, all the while running his foundation, his winery, and the Chinese Basketball Association. We couldn't be more proud!


Join us at the Tasting Room on Friday, July 20th, and every other Friday through Labor Day, as we present our Summer Concert Series. Music starts at 5:30pm and the tasting room will be open until 9:00pm, featuring free bites and drink specials. As always, no admission charge!

UPCOMING SHOWS:

Friday, July 20th: The Rusty String Express

Friday, August 3rd: The Al James Band

Friday, August 17th: The Peter Welker Sextet

Friday, August 31st: Jealous Zelig



 

This September, we'll be releasing our 2015 YAO MING Family Reserve Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. We are proud to announce that this vintage is one of the highest-acclaimed wines we have released since our debut vintage in 2009.


"One Of The Top 100 Wines of 2017. 96 Points." ~ James Suckling
96 Points, Jeb Dunnuck
95+ Points, Robert Parker

With reviews pending from Wine Spectator, Wine Enthusiast and Decanter, the 2015 vintage is destined to become a classic. As always, Founders Club Members receive the first allocation of the Family Reserve, with any remaining bottles available exclusively through the tasting room. The Family Reserve Cabernet sells out quickly each year. Click Here to join The Founders Club and reserve your allocation today.

Time Posted: Jul 13, 2018 at 12:08 PM
John Taylor
 
April 11, 2018 | John Taylor

Our Spring 2018 Newsletter

Hello friends!

Spring has come to Napa Valley. Though 2018 has seen its fair share of "April Showers," the vines are showing beautiful bud break, and the mustard flowers between the rows are in full bloom. It's a time when the valley wakes up from its long winter's nap and comes alive with wildflowers and rolling, green grass. Truly, Napa is one of the most beautiful places on Earth. 

Spring is a time for Napa's crisp, floral, white wines. We are proud to be releasing our 2017 Napa Crest Sauvignon Blanc this month, just in time for warm Spring days and lingering sunsets. We hope you'll come and visit us here in St. Helena, and enjoy one of the many special events we have planned for you!

~Tom Hinde, President & Winemaker

Yao Family Wines is proud to partner with acclaimed San Francisco restaurant Koi Palace to create our Fresh Tastes of Spring Wine & Dim Sum Tasting Event. Koi Palace has created four, custom pieces of dim sum using fresh, seasonal ingredients, specifically to pair with four of our wines. Join us Saturday, April 28th at our St. Helena tasting room and experience how the subtlety of these exotic flavors are complimented by our hand-crafted Napa wines. Only sixty pairings available. Click Here to learn more and reserve your seating! 

From our Oakville bench property in the south of Napa comes the third bottling of our acclaimed Napa Crest Sauvignon Blanc. Created in the Bordeaux style with 92% Sauvignon Blanc and 8% Semillon, the 2017 vintage shows classic Napa Valley providence with aromas of melon, fig and fresh pear. Let the Spring begin! Click Here to get yours.

Friday nights this spring mean wine and song at the Yao Family Wines tasting room! Join us for our evening concert series, featuring a variety of talented jazz performers from around the Bay Area. Relax with a glass of wine before dinner, or swing by afterwards for a drink with friends - we'll be open until 9pm. Our concert series stars Friday, May 11th, and continues May 24th, June 8t and June 22nd. Check the Events page on our website for updates.

Just in time for Fathers Day, we'll be releasing the 2015 vintage of the YAO MING Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. Rated 94 Points by Robert Parker, our flagship Cabernet reflects all the pedigree of its Rutherford origin, and is sure to be a classic on your table and in your cellar. Founders Club Members will receive their allocation first on June 4th, followed by the general release two weeks later...you can also get your first taste of the remarkable 2015 vintage at our Second Annual Summer Barbecue, June 2nd at the tasting room...Mothers Day is May 13th, so we're inviting all moms to come by the tasting room and enjoy a well-deserved, complimentary glass of our 2016 YAO MING Napa Valley Brut Sparkling Wine. See you there!

Time Posted: Apr 11, 2018 at 9:09 AM
John Taylor
 
February 5, 2018 | John Taylor

Yao Ming Teams Up With WildAid To Spread Valentines Love All The Way to Africa

Time Posted: Feb 5, 2018 at 11:13 AM
John Taylor
 
January 31, 2018 | John Taylor

Our 2018 Winter Newsletter

 

Hello friends!
 
Winter has come to Napa Valley. The days are shorter - and colder - and some welcome rain has finally arrived this month. The season has its own kind of beauty: thick, brown vines that have lost their leaves dominate the landscape, and a carpet of vivid, green grass lays atop the vineyards. Clouds hug the hillsides, and fog rolls across the valley floor. Napa is truly a unique place to visit any time of the year...and you can't beat the hotel prices in February!

The cold weather is a time for hearty reds. We invite you to go online and stock up on Cabernet and Red Blends for your winter nights, or better still, come visit us at our St. Helena tasting room - have a seat by the fire, enjoy a glass of Cabernet, and see all the beauty that winter in Napa as to offer.


~Tom Hinde, President & Winemaker

 

Yao Family Wines is proud to partner with acclaimed San Francisco restaurant Koi Palace to celebrate the Year of The Dog with a day of dim sum and wine pairings. Koi Palace has created four, custom pieces of dim sum specifically to pair with four of our wines. On February 10th from 10am to 5pm, Come to our St. Helena tasting room and experience how the subtlety of these exotic flavors are complimented by our hand-crafted Napa wines. Only fifty pairings available. Click Here to purchase your tickets. 

 
 

Celebrate The Year of The Dog with this limited edition, commemorative bottling of our 2014 Napa Crest Red Wine (rated 92 Points, Wine Enthusiast). Featuring a label custom designed for Yao Family Wines, this bottle makes a thoughtful gift or a delicious addition to your Chinese New Year celebration. Only 100 bottles created. Not available in stores. Click Here to get yours.

Yao Family Wines is proud to announce that the first wine in our new Appellation Series, the 2015 YAO MING Cabernet Sauvignon, Howell Mountain, Napa Valley, has been awarded 94 Points by Robert Parker. Your chance to add this extraordinary wine to your cellar is running out, as we have only 12 cases remaining before it goes permanently into our Library (accessible only to Founders Club members). Click here to order - less than ten cases remaining!


 

Yao Family Wines is once again teaming up with WildAid to spread the love for Valentines Day. All through February, purchase a bottle of our Napa Crest Rose and we'll donate $5 to help WildAid save endangered wildlife. Post a picture of your bottle on any of your social channels and we'll donate $5 more...we'll be having a Post-Run Party for The Napa Valley Marathonon March 4th, as winemaker Tom Hinde himself will be running the race...We've created another one-of-a-kind wine for the upcoming Premiere Napa Valley auction on February 24th. If you're a member of the trade looking for something really special, check out the Napa Valley Vintner's site for more details. We'll be holding a special reception for members of the trade February 23rd at our Tasting Room.

John Taylor
 
July 12, 2017 | John Taylor

The 5 Things You Need To Know About Swirling Wine

Your friend pops open a magnificent bottle of 94 point 2013 YAO MING Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, pours herself a glass, and starts swirling it around. She's not tasting it. She's not even looking at it yet. Just swirling it around and around her glass. Is this the ultimate in pretense or does she know something you don't?

The truth is, she may know 5 things you should know about swirling wine...

1. Wine is primarily "tasted" with the nose. Believe it or not, the complexity of a wine's taste is created through our nose and not our mouth. Our taste buds can distinguish sour, bitter, salty, sweet and savory. The wide array of fruit, earthy, floral, herbal, mineral and woodsy flavors present in wine are derived from aroma notes sensed by the olfactory bulb. When a wine is swirled, literally hundreds of different aromas are released, the subtlety of which can only be detected with the nose. By swirling, a wine's aromas attach themselves to oxygen (and are thus less masked by alcohol) and are easier to smell. If you want to test the power of the nose, try plugging your nostrils and tasting the wine at the same time.

2. Swirling actually eliminates foul-smelling compounds. Oxygen at work again! Swirling the wine in the glass enables some evaporation to take place, which means more of the volatile compounds will dissipate. Some of these compounds include sulfides (matchsticks) and sulfites, (rotten eggs). 

3. Swirling in a wide glass is more effective than a narrow glass. Have you seen those huge Reidel glasses that look like they could hold half a bottle of wine, and wondered what was the point of an enormous wine glass like that? More space in the wine glass means the wine gets more surface area, and thus more exposure to oxygen. This is especially helpful with older wines. This is also the reason why your Sommelier pours only a small amount in your glass when you first taste the bottle: She wants the wine to have optimum exposure to oxygen when you swirl, smell and taste.

4. Swirling exposes the "legs" of a wine, revealing its viscosity. The way the wine swirls gives you a first indication of the wine' "texture:" its thickness or viscosity. A dense wine, full of tannins or sugar will tend to spin more slowly around the glass, sticking to the sides.

5. Yes, as a matter of fact, it does look cool. But here's a little trick so you look like a pro and  covered in wine from your swirling practice: don't lift the glass when you swirl. Set the glass on the table or counter, hold the base down with your index and middle finger, then start moving the glass around in circles. You simply won't spill wine this way.

And here's a bonus! What's the difference between aroma and bouquet? A wine's aroma typically refers to the pleasant smells in a wine that give it specific character (varietal character). We say that Merlot has aromas of cherry and Chardonnay has aromas of tropical fruit. A wine's bouquet comes from the smells created by the winemaking process or the wine's aging. When we smell oak, for example, that's considered to be part of a wine's bouquet.

So, swirl that wine! It's all part of the pleasure...and the fun!

Time Posted: Jul 12, 2017 at 8:16 AM
John Taylor
 
June 28, 2017 | John Taylor

Napa Insiders Share Their Favorite Alternative White Wines For Summer

Summer’s in full swing, which means it’s time for beach trips, camping, pool parties, or just lounging away in the backyard, enjoying the longest days of the year. Of course, summer also means light, crisp refreshing white wines to pair with all that lounging and partying.

At Yao Family Wines, we make a Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc in the classic Bordeaux style, with a blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon. This blend creates a delicate yet complex wine, with an acidity that makes it perfect with seasonal, summertime dishes. But what if you want to try something a little bit different; something to expand the pallet without deflating the wallet? We asked a handful of Napa Valley insiders for their suggestions on new, exciting and different white wines to try.

 

“I recently tasted the 2016 Swanson Vineyards Pinot Grigio. At $21 bucks a bottle, it’s an affordable, fun, fresh and food-friendly wine. Pair this white wine with the recent heat wave and you’ve got yourself a pairing perfect for porch pounding!” ~ Monique Soltani, Host, WineOH.tv

Chateu Yvonne Saumur Blanc (Chenin Blanc). Killing it! I had this in New York at Rebel, and then less than a month later I got to meet Matthieu, the winemaker, in the Loire Valley. I think his Chenin is all the things a Chenin should be: refreshing and crisp for a hot day, bit also minerality, stone, pear, and a silky texture that has richness without being too weighty. ~ Terra Jane Albee, Whiterock Vineyards.

“The 2016 Ancien Pinot Gris. Great acidity and tropical notes.” ~ Jimmy Kawalek, President, Coombsville Vintners & Growers Association.

"If you're looking for the true Chardonnay alternative, get a bottle of Aligote, the 'Other White Wine of Burgundy.' A great choice is the 2015 Maison Chanzy Bouzeron Clos de la Fortune Monopole, which is pretty widely available at about twenty bucks. Aligote's flavor profile lives somewhere between SB and Chardonnay, but with a unique acidity and minerality. It's amazing." ~ Allen Desuaniers, Marketing Manager, The DAR Label Group.

And I'll go ahead and throw my choice into the fray as well: The 2016 Kale Napa Valley Somerston Vineyards Grenache Blanc. Grenache Blanc is one of the souther Rhone's lesser-known and utilized varietals, but as a stand-alone wine, it has exquisite character. If made in the old world style, it has a lower alcohol content which makes it go down easy on a hot day. 

Enjoy the summer, and comment below to let us know what alternative white wine you've been drinking!

Time Posted: Jun 28, 2017 at 10:28 AM
John Taylor
 
May 16, 2017 | John Taylor

Our Spring 2017 Newsletter!

Hello friends!

Spring is one of our all-time favorite seasons here in Napa Valley. It's the official start of the growing season, with bud break happening all over the valley. The weather is just how we like it up here: Clear, warm days, crisp, cool nights. A perfect time for the Roses and Sauvignon Blancs we release this time of year. We sincerely hope that if your travel plans bring you to Napa, you'll come and visit us and see for yourself how special this time of year is.

We are also immensely proud of our founder, Yao Ming, who was recently named to head up the Chinese Basketball Association. He will be responsible for all aspects of professional and Olympic basketball in China, and we think they couldn't have chosen a better person for the job!

Cheers!

          ~Tom Hinde, President & Winemaker

To order the 2016 Napa Crest Rose, Click Here.

Time Posted: May 16, 2017 at 1:53 PM
John Taylor
 
May 3, 2017 | John Taylor

The Difference You Need To Know Between Tannin And Acid

Working in the tasting room at Yao Family Wines in St. Helena, perhaps the second most common question we receive from both beginners and experts alike is, “what's the difference between tannin and acid?” (the first most common is, “How tall is Yao Ming?”). This is a critical question, as the two can be quite easily confused. Let’s shed a little more light on the subject.

First, let’s take a closer look at tannin. Tannin is a naturally-occurring phenolic compound, found in the skins, seeds and stems of a grape. It can also be added to a wine through aging in an oak barrel. Phenols typically add a flavor of astringency and bitterness to a wine, which may sound awful, but that same quality is what gives a wine balance, structure and complexity, allowing it to age longer. Best of all, tannins provide the antioxidants in wine that have all the health benefits. Although these phenolic compounds are found in all wines in various amounts, we usually associate tannins with red wines, as the juice has extended contact with the phenol-rich skins, stems and seeds during fermentation.

Tannin is often confused with "dryness" because tannin imparts a dry feeling in your mouth. Dry, however, is a wine term used to denote the level of sweetness in the wine. Again, it's the astringency that creates the feeling of your cheeks being sucked in and themoisture evaporating from your mouth. This is one of the most primary characteristics of tannin.

Acid, on the other hand, is what gives wine it’s refreshing, flavorful sensation. Acidity is apparent in all fruit, be it grapes, lemons or tomatoes (yes, tomatoes are a fruit). Grapes start out as being entirely acidic, and as they develop the acid turns into sugar. Harvesting grapes at a key balance point between sugar and acid is critical, as is allowing the sugar to convert to alcohol in the fermentation process so the acid is lively and predominant. Too little acid and the wine can seem flabby and lifeless. Too much acid and the wine will be harsh and undrinkable. Acid is also determined by the climate in which the grapes were grown as well as the soil type and physiology of the grape itself. Higher acidity denotes a wine from a cooler region, such as Northern France. Lower acid wines come from countries with warmer weather, such as parts of Australia.

The primary types of acid that are key to winemaking are tartaric, malic and citric. Perhaps the most important element of acid management in winemaking is Malolactic Fermentation. Also called malo, this is a secondary fermentation that converts the tangy and harsh malic acids into creamier and softer lactic acids. When you think of the buttery characteristics of a Chardonnay, for example, this is because the wine has undergone malo to create a rounder mouth feel.

Tasting the Difference Between Tannin and Acid:

Tannins taste bitter on the front-inside of your mouth and along the side of your tongue; Acid tastes tart and zesty on the front of your tongue and along the sides.
Acid makes your mouth feel wet; Tannin makes your tongue feel dry.
With tannins, you feel a lingering bitter/dry feeling in your mouth after you swallow; With acid, your tongue feels gravelly against the roof of your mouth. Acid can also activate the saliva glands underneath your tongue.

Here's a fun way to explore the difference between tannin and acid. Get yourself two bottles of red wine. The first should be a big, bold Napa Cabernet, and the second should be an Italian red like a Valpolicella or Chianti (avoid hearty italians like Super Tuscans and Sangiovese). Taste them side-by-side, trying the Italian wine first. You'll notice with the Chianti a certain kind of effervescence in the wine. This is the lively acid inherent in Chiantis. The Napa Cab, on the other hand, will probably suck all the moisture from your mouth. This is the tannin in action. 

So what did you think, tasting those side-by-side? Leave us a comment below and let us know!

Time Posted: May 3, 2017 at 5:54 AM
John Taylor
 
March 8, 2017 | John Taylor

Five Things You Need To Know For Rosé Season

With the first buds of spring fast approaching, Rose season is just around the corner. Rosé is typically the first release of the year for most winemakers, due to its relatively quick winemaking process. If you've explored the joys or Rosé, then you're as excited as we are for this time of year. But If you're new to the world of this delicious, complex and versatile wine, we'd like to offer you five things you should know to make your Rose adventure a great one.

1. Rosé Isn't A Cheap Wine - It's Just Inexpensive To Make. With the possible exception of a Chateau D'Esclans, you just don't see any $100 Rosé. In fact, you're hard pressed to find a Rosé over $40. So is it a cheap wine? Not at all. It's simply inexpensive to make. In essence, Rosé is a by-product of making other wines. Rosé is the run-off juice created through one of three processes used in making both red and white wines. In this respect, you get two wines to sell for the cost of one.

The maceration method is most commonly used for Rosé. Maceration is when the grapes are pressed and sit in their skins. This istypically done in red wine production, where maceration usually lasts throughout the fermentation. For Rosé, the juice is separated from the skins before it gets too dark. For lighter varieties, it can last a day or longer. For darker varietals, like Merlot, the process sometimes only lasts a few hours.

The Vin Gris method is when red grapes are used to make a nearly-white wine. Vin Gris utilizes extremely short maceration times. This style is popular for light red varietals like Pinot Noir, Gamay or Cinsault. 

The Saignée method is actually a by-product of red winemaking. During the fermentation of a red wine, about 10% of the juice is bled off. This process leaves a higher ratio of skin contact on the remaining juice, making the resulting red wine richer and bolder. The leftover bled wine or “Saignée” is then fermented into Rosé. Wines made from the Saignée method are typically much darker and more dry than Maceration Method wines.

2. Rosé Can Be Both Dry And Sweet. Repeat after me: "White Zinfandel is not Rosé." Rosé has received a bad rap from other pink, sweet wines. The more you taste, however, the more you'll realize that some Rosés can be as dry as their red and white wine counterparts. It all depends on when the fermentation process is completed or suspended. Rosés that are allowed to complete their fermentation use up all the sugar in the process and are therefore dry. Rosés that are stopped during the fermentation process before all the sugar is converted to alcohol can be less dry. We tend to like a little sweeter Rosé for sipping by the pool, and a little dryer for eating with a meal. 

 

3. Don't Know Which Wine To Pair With Your Meal? Get A Rosé. Rosé is the ultimate food wine, mostly because it is typically lower in alcohol and higher in acidity. In effect, Rosés have the flavor characteristics of both red and white wines. Rosés have both floral and herbacious notes, and often have both tropical fruit and dark fruit flavors as well. They're both subtle and complex, making them a perfect pairing for almost any dish. So get adventurous: Take that Summer Sipper off the porch and into the dinning room!

 

4. Rosé Can Be Made From Almost Any Grape. Nearly every wine grape you can imagine has been used to make Rosé. Some of the most popular varietals include Grenache, Syrah, Mouvedre (The Holy Trinity of Rosé blends in France), Pinot Noir, Cinsault, Carignan and Sangiovese. Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot are especially popular in Napa Valley. So which to choose? A good rule of thumb is this: If you like the flavor profile of a certain varietal, seek that varietal out in your Rosé. In other words, if you like the way Cabernet tastes, drink a Rosé of Cabernet.

5. To Chill Or Not To Chill? If Rosé is kind of a red wine and kind of a white wine, then should it be served chilled or at room temperature? Generally, when you lower the temperature of a wine, it reduces the biting effect of the alcohol, making it "easier" to drink. This is why Rosé is such a sought-after spring & summer wine: A wine with a lower alcohol profile that's also chilled goes down fast, smooth and refreshing.

On the other hand, colder temperatures can mask the subtleties of flavor in a wine. You may be short-changing your experience if you drink a Rose of Cabernet, Merlot or even Pinot Noir at too cold a temperature. We recommend you drink your Rosé at around 60-65 degrees. 

John Taylor
 
February 9, 2017 | John Taylor

Wine Business Insiders Give Their Top Tips For An Enjoyable Tasting Experience

Traveling to Napa, or indeed any of the world’s great wine regions, can be a once-in-a-lifetime experience. There is truly nothing like a day tasting world-class Napa Valley Cabernet, taking in an evening with a culinary masterpiece, and a night in a vineyard under the stars. But for wine tasting newcomers, a trip to winery or tasting room can be a bit intimidating: So many varietals, vintages, glasses and tasting methods…it can be overwhelming to first time visitors.

For most people, a trip to wine country may indeed be a once-in a lifetime experience, so making the best of it is critical. So we spoke to some of our favorite, most knowledgeable wine-industry insiders to get their expert advice on how to make the most of your next wine tasting adventure!

AnnaBelle Walter, Wine Industry Marketing Executive: Do your research! I'd say poll the group and determine your main goal. Is it visiting a property steeped in history, or one with state-of-the-art technology? Want to enjoy sweeping views from a panoramic deck, or do you and your friends prefer to explore subterranean caves? Do your research (also on price point and wine style), and choose 2-3 wineries per day max that fit your parameters to get the most out of the experience.

Becky Tyner Sandoval, Small Lots Big Wines: Keep hydrated!

Regina FellBoisset Family Estates: Take your time. Don’t slug it down: Taste it and savor it. Swirl, sniff, sip and savor.Customers at Yao Family Wines Tasting Room

Anna Eagan, Tasting Room Associate: If your host has served you, entertained you, helped you in any way and provided you with a pleasant experience, it is appropriate and encouraged to tip them. They may even have some special tidbits of their own to share with you!

Terra Jane Albee, White Rock Vineyards: Don’t be intimidated. Ask questions, pay attention. Don’t take it too seriously. Enjoy!

Buddy Bowles, Bremer Family Estates: Your Host is there to provide a memorable experience; help by being courteous when he or she is explaining their wines. (You’re not at) a bar, but a wine tasting of some of the best wines you may ever taste. As Maya Angelou said, "I have learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Francesca Cunningham, Winery Social Media Expert: What’s that metal container on the bar? It’s a spittoon! It's ok to spit, especially if you are the driver. It will make your day longer and your morning less painful.

Sheila Thomas, Yao Family Wines Tasting Room Coordinator:  Call ahead, even if it's not a "By Appointment Only" Tasting Room. The gesture will be appreciated and will mean you get a host who's expecting you, and usually better service.

Most of all, just have fun! The benefit of wine tasting is that it allows you to discover your own personal palette. You’re there to try new things. Over time, you’ll become an expert too!

The staff at Yao Family Wines is happy to help you plan your next trip and give you recommendations on wineries, restaurants and experiences. Call us anytime at 707-968-5874.

Time Posted: Feb 9, 2017 at 2:43 PM